Understanding BS7858 Standard

The British Standards Institution (BSI) has recently revised the British Standard for Security Screening of Security Personnel (BS7858:2004). The new code of practice BS7858:2019 came into effect at the end of September 2020, substituting the revoked BS7858:2012 revised standard, which was rescinded on the 31st  March 2020. The BS7858 standard has become progressively more crucial when it comes to the protection of individuals, goods & services, estate, and personal data. The BS7858 safeguards such elements by guaranteeing that the veracity of the person authorised to access such sensitive data is certified and retains as such.

There is a lot of misrepresentation circulating regarding the changes to BS7858 Standard which CRI Group, as the only company in the Middle East and Asian region with an implemented BS 7858:2019 standard and BS 102000:2018 code of practice for investigative services and ISO27001 (Information Security Management System) certification, want to help clean up.

Why is BS7858 so important? 

It is no secret that confidence is key when it comes to the mass of decision ruling. Instilling confidence in its personnel is critical for all organisations and their triumph, particularly when said personnel oversees susceptible individuals, valuable resources or data protection. Organisations have to be able to guarantee that their security personnel have been subordinate to the best meticulous screening process. This ensures pleased clients, as well as pleased personnel as the foundation to a fortunate and reliable organisation, begins from within. The BS7585 aids organisations to avoid scandals such as:

The revised BS7858 has been made clear that the responsibility and accountability for the security and effectiveness of the vetting process rest with the organisation itself and leading management. The BS7858:2019 connects with the move we have seen worldwide to corporate social responsibility and compliance and follows that trend. Other occurrences of the movement consist of instances such as the GDPR (April 2016) and the FCA (Dec 2020) which both expect leading management to be practical in their approach to compliance.

As a significant volume of data requires authentication in a screening process, several organisations may find executing an employee screening and vetting process to be highly complex. Additionally, the degree of evaluation of the applicant’s provisional data must be carried out effectively as well as promptly and include specific checks, such as credit checks or checks against the Financial Services Register.

BSI brought the BS7858 Standard to 2021 with the inclusion of:

Right to Work checks in line with Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) identity requirements:

In antithesis to common acceptance, the BS7858-compliant vetting checks do not need to include DBS checks. This is due to the fact that the Security Industry Authority (SIA) oversees these criminal record checks as part of an individual’s registration process. Nevertheless, they do continue to be a measure of best practice, and the revised Standard firmly contends in its favour. See 7.3.2 (c) and 7.7. (j) in the 7858 Standard. Organisations can also refer to the SIA’s ‘Get Licensed’ handbook which asserts that when an operative is in connection with children or susceptible adults, the Standard or an alternate heightened degree of admission should be deemed essential.

Global watchlist checks during the application process

7.4 (c) of the BS7858 Standard comprises the compulsory requirement to examine a variety of international watchlists, sanctions and fraud databases. Hitherto to this, the Standard simply asked the examining of the HMG sanctions list. 

Social media checks as an advised best practice for pre-and post-employment

Personnel social media posts could generate problems for organisations that are operational in protected and regulated conditions; BSI has updated the BS7858 Standard to consider this matter. The BS7858:2019 Standard urges organisations to complete social media screening pre and post-employment.

Searching for supplementary data utilizing best practice social media and additional open-source internet checks can support your organisation with superior perceptions and decrease your employee risk.

For extra assistance on social media and further knowledge on the perils of social media within your organisation, please see our article and free playbook on “Risks of Cybercrime & Social Media“. A complete Guide on How to Protect Your Organisation and Team!

Other significant changes of the BS7858 Standard:

  • Removal of character references
  • Approval to passing on pre-employment screening records from vocation to vocation.
  • Conditional Offer: Formerly, there were two steps an employer was obliged to follow before making an offer of conditional employment; fulfilling the stipulated preliminary checks and adequately fulfilling limited screening on the subject. The new standard initiated the third element on top of the other two conditions – to commence a risk review and confirm that “the degree of risk in the envisioned employment has been evaluated and is deemed to be acceptable and documented” and consequently, the organisation is happy to extend the offer based on their evaluation and the candidate’s risk profile.
  • Preservation of candidates’ background screening records during their employment. Ineffective applicants records can be retained for 12 months while for ex-employees, particular records can be kept for an additional seven years after the employment ended.
  • All groups involved in carrying out BS7858 vetting should be prepared for envisioned obligations.

It is clear to see that the BS7858 standard is crucial for employment in not only the security region but each region of employment; pre-employment screening expending the updated BS7858 standards promises that each member of the public, from manual labourers to office workers, can maintain life in a safe environment.

If the new standard still feels a little daunting to you, why not consider booking a free 30-minute consultation with one of our experts here at CRI Group? Our specialists have years of experience and are qualified to offer your organisation personalised guidance to fit your professional requirements. Don’t hesitate, get in touch today and stay on ahead of the vetting rules and regulations.

Get in Touch

Author bio

Zafar I. Anjum, is Group CEO of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, integrity due diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading business organisations. Headquartered in London, with offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China and USA, CRI is licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM.

Contact Details

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, LLM, CFE, CII, MABI, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime), Int. Dip. (GRC)
CRI Group Chief Executive Officer
37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA, United Kingdom
t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

 

More on BS 7858 and employment background screening…

 

The British Standards Institution (BSI) has recently revised the British Standard for Security Screening of Security Personnel (BS7858:2004). The new code of practice BS7858:2019 came into effect at the end of September 2020, substituting the revoked BS7858:2012 revised standard, which was rescinded on the 31st  March 2020. The BS7858 standard has become progressively more crucial when it comes to the protection of individuals, goods & services, estate, and personal data. The BS7858 safeguards such elements by guaranteeing that the veracity of the person authorised to access such sensitive data is certified and retains as such.

There is a lot of misrepresentation circulating regarding the changes to BS7858 Standard which CRI Group, as the only company in the Middle East and Asian region with an implemented BS 7858:2019 standard and BS 102000:2018 code of practice for investigative services and ISO27001 (Information Security Management System) certification, want to help clean up.

Why is BS7858 so important? 

It is no secret that confidence is key when it comes to the mass of decision ruling. Instilling confidence in its personnel is critical for all organisations and their triumph, particularly when said personnel oversees susceptible individuals, valuable resources or data protection. Organisations have to be able to guarantee that their security personnel have been subordinate to the best meticulous screening process. This ensures pleased clients, as well as pleased personnel as the foundation to a fortunate and reliable organisation, begins from within. The BS7585 aids organisations to avoid scandals such as:

The revised BS7858 has been made clear that the responsibility and accountability for the security and effectiveness of the vetting process rest with the organisation itself and leading management. The BS7858:2019 connects with the move we have seen worldwide to corporate social responsibility and compliance and follows that trend. Other occurrences of the movement consist of instances such as the GDPR (April 2016) and the FCA (Dec 2020) which both expect leading management to be practical in their approach to compliance.

As a significant volume of data requires authentication in a screening process, several organisations may find executing an employee screening and vetting process to be highly complex. Additionally, the degree of evaluation of the applicant’s provisional data must be carried out effectively as well as promptly and include specific checks, such as credit checks or checks against the Financial Services Register.

BSI brought the BS7858 Standard to 2021 with the inclusion of:

Right to Work checks in line with Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) identity requirements:

In antithesis to common acceptance, the BS7858-compliant vetting checks do not need to include DBS checks. This is due to the fact that the Security Industry Authority (SIA) oversees these criminal record checks as part of an individual’s registration process. Nevertheless, they do continue to be a measure of best practice, and the revised Standard firmly contends in its favour. See 7.3.2 (c) and 7.7. (j) in the 7858 Standard. Organisations can also refer to the SIA’s ‘Get Licensed’ handbook which asserts that when an operative is in connection with children or susceptible adults, the Standard or an alternate heightened degree of admission should be deemed essential.

Global watchlist checks during the application process

7.4 (c) of the BS7858 Standard comprises the compulsory requirement to examine a variety of international watchlists, sanctions and fraud databases. Hitherto to this, the Standard simply asked the examining of the HMG sanctions list. 

Social media checks as an advised best practice for pre-and post-employment

Personnel social media posts could generate problems for organisations that are operational in protected and regulated conditions; BSI has updated the BS7858 Standard to consider this matter. The BS7858:2019 Standard urges organisations to complete social media screening pre and post-employment.

Searching for supplementary data utilizing best practice social media and additional open-source internet checks can support your organisation with superior perceptions and decrease your employee risk.

For extra assistance on social media and further knowledge on the perils of social media within your organisation, please see our article and free playbook on “Risks of Cybercrime & Social Media“. A complete Guide on How to Protect Your Organisation and Team!

Other significant changes of the BS7858 Standard:

  • Removal of character references
  • Approval to passing on pre-employment screening records from vocation to vocation.
  • Conditional Offer: Formerly, there were two steps an employer was obliged to follow before making an offer of conditional employment; fulfilling the stipulated preliminary checks and adequately fulfilling limited screening on the subject. The new standard initiated the third element on top of the other two conditions – to commence a risk review and confirm that “the degree of risk in the envisioned employment has been evaluated and is deemed to be acceptable and documented” and consequently, the organisation is happy to extend the offer based on their evaluation and the candidate’s risk profile.
  • Preservation of candidates’ background screening records during their employment. Ineffective applicants records can be retained for 12 months while for ex-employees, particular records can be kept for an additional seven years after the employment ended.
  • All groups involved in carrying out BS7858 vetting should be prepared for envisioned obligations.

It is clear to see that the BS7858 standard is crucial for employment in not only the security region but each region of employment; pre-employment screening expending the updated BS7858 standards promises that each member of the public, from manual labourers to office workers, can maintain life in a safe environment.

If the new standard still feels a little daunting to you, why not consider booking a free 30-minute consultation with one of our experts here at CRI Group? Our specialists have years of experience and are qualified to offer your organisation personalised guidance to fit your professional requirements. Don’t hesitate, get in touch today and stay on ahead of the vetting rules and regulations.

Get in Touch

Author bio

Zafar I. Anjum, is Group CEO of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, integrity due diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading business organisations. Headquartered in London, with offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China and USA, CRI is licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM.

Contact Details

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, LLM, CFE, CII, MABI, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime), Int. Dip. (GRC)
CRI Group Chief Executive Officer
37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA, United Kingdom
t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

 

More on BS 7858 and employment background screening…

 

The British Standards Institution (BSI) has recently revised the British Standard for Security Screening of Security Personnel (BS7858:2004). The new code of practice BS7858:2019 came into effect at the end of September 2020, substituting the revoked BS7858:2012 revised standard, which was rescinded on the 31st  March 2020. The BS7858 standard has become progressively more crucial when it comes to the protection of individuals, goods & services, estate, and personal data. The BS7858 safeguards such elements by guaranteeing that the veracity of the person authorised to access such sensitive data is certified and retains as such.

There is a lot of misrepresentation circulating regarding the changes to BS7858 Standard which CRI Group, as the only company in the Middle East and Asian region with an implemented BS 7858:2019 standard and BS 102000:2018 code of practice for investigative services and ISO27001 (Information Security Management System) certification, want to help clean up.

Why is BS7858 so important? 

It is no secret that confidence is key when it comes to the mass of decision ruling. Instilling confidence in its personnel is critical for all organisations and their triumph, particularly when said personnel oversees susceptible individuals, valuable resources or data protection. Organisations have to be able to guarantee that their security personnel have been subordinate to the best meticulous screening process. This ensures pleased clients, as well as pleased personnel as the foundation to a fortunate and reliable organisation, begins from within. The BS7585 aids organisations to avoid scandals such as:

The revised BS7858 has been made clear that the responsibility and accountability for the security and effectiveness of the vetting process rest with the organisation itself and leading management. The BS7858:2019 connects with the move we have seen worldwide to corporate social responsibility and compliance and follows that trend. Other occurrences of the movement consist of instances such as the GDPR (April 2016) and the FCA (Dec 2020) which both expect leading management to be practical in their approach to compliance.

As a significant volume of data requires authentication in a screening process, several organisations may find executing an employee screening and vetting process to be highly complex. Additionally, the degree of evaluation of the applicant’s provisional data must be carried out effectively as well as promptly and include specific checks, such as credit checks or checks against the Financial Services Register.

BSI brought the BS7858 Standard to 2021 with the inclusion of:

Right to Work checks in line with Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) identity requirements:

In antithesis to common acceptance, the BS7858-compliant vetting checks do not need to include DBS checks. This is due to the fact that the Security Industry Authority (SIA) oversees these criminal record checks as part of an individual’s registration process. Nevertheless, they do continue to be a measure of best practice, and the revised Standard firmly contends in its favour. See 7.3.2 (c) and 7.7. (j) in the 7858 Standard. Organisations can also refer to the SIA’s ‘Get Licensed’ handbook which asserts that when an operative is in connection with children or susceptible adults, the Standard or an alternate heightened degree of admission should be deemed essential.

Global watchlist checks during the application process

7.4 (c) of the BS7858 Standard comprises the compulsory requirement to examine a variety of international watchlists, sanctions and fraud databases. Hitherto to this, the Standard simply asked the examining of the HMG sanctions list. 

Social media checks as an advised best practice for pre-and post-employment

Personnel social media posts could generate problems for organisations that are operational in protected and regulated conditions; BSI has updated the BS7858 Standard to consider this matter. The BS7858:2019 Standard urges organisations to complete social media screening pre and post-employment.

Searching for supplementary data utilizing best practice social media and additional open-source internet checks can support your organisation with superior perceptions and decrease your employee risk.

For extra assistance on social media and further knowledge on the perils of social media within your organisation, please see our article and free playbook on “Risks of Cybercrime & Social Media“. A complete Guide on How to Protect Your Organisation and Team!

Other significant changes of the BS7858 Standard:

  • Removal of character references
  • Approval to passing on pre-employment screening records from vocation to vocation.
  • Conditional Offer: Formerly, there were two steps an employer was obliged to follow before making an offer of conditional employment; fulfilling the stipulated preliminary checks and adequately fulfilling limited screening on the subject. The new standard initiated the third element on top of the other two conditions – to commence a risk review and confirm that “the degree of risk in the envisioned employment has been evaluated and is deemed to be acceptable and documented” and consequently, the organisation is happy to extend the offer based on their evaluation and the candidate’s risk profile.
  • Preservation of candidates’ background screening records during their employment. Ineffective applicants records can be retained for 12 months while for ex-employees, particular records can be kept for an additional seven years after the employment ended.
  • All groups involved in carrying out BS7858 vetting should be prepared for envisioned obligations.

It is clear to see that the BS7858 standard is crucial for employment in not only the security region but each region of employment; pre-employment screening expending the updated BS7858 standards promises that each member of the public, from manual labourers to office workers, can maintain life in a safe environment.

If the new standard still feels a little daunting to you, why not consider booking a free 30-minute consultation with one of our experts here at CRI Group? Our specialists have years of experience and are qualified to offer your organisation personalised guidance to fit your professional requirements. Don’t hesitate, get in touch today and stay on ahead of the vetting rules and regulations.

Get in Touch

Author bio

Zafar I. Anjum, is Group CEO of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, integrity due diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading business organisations. Headquartered in London, with offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China and USA, CRI is licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM.

Contact Details

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, LLM, CFE, CII, MABI, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime), Int. Dip. (GRC)
CRI Group Chief Executive Officer
37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA, United Kingdom
t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

 

More on BS 7858 and employment background screening…

 

How to Identify and Prevent Employee Fraud?

In 2017 the major European ABB conglomerate admitted that an employee took advantage of serious management failings to disappear with $103 million of the firm’s cash. According to CNN business, ABB CEO Ulrich Spiesshofer and Chief Financial Officer Eric Elzvik admitted that the organisations managers had failed to maintain sufficient segregation of duties in the treasury unit of its subsidiary in South Korea and did not provide enough oversight of local treasury activities.

To top it all off, ABB also failed to keep the signature seals of the South Korean unit secure which as a result, has lead the company became “bound to unauthorised financial contracts, resulting in undetected financial obligations.” 

Organisations rely on the honesty and integrity of their employees, however employee fraud does unfortunately cost companies vast sums of money. Employee fraud is a reality across all sectors – no matter how credible a job applicant is and how stringent your hiring process is – your business is at risk.

Tips on Identifying and Preventing Employee Fraud

When you trust your employees, it is difficult to think the worst of them, even when there are red flags – circumstances or patterns that are out of the ordinary – alerting you to the contrary. If you have suspicions of employee fraud, it is recommended to hire a forensic accountant to help you detect fraud, understand your circumstances, and put together evidence to target and confront the employee without tipping them off.

The good news is that you can plan and train your team to prevent this from taking place; the best thing you can do for your business is to learn how to recognise the warning signs of employee fraud and have robust procedures in place to minimise the risks and opportunities for fraud. Employee fraud covers a wide range of fraudulent activities in the workplace and can vary in seriousness including embezzlement.

Embezzlement involves an employee who transfers company funds into their bank account. One example of an act of embezzlement is deliberately writing cheques in the employees’ name or diverting company assets without authorisation, e.g. customers unknowingly pay into an employee-controlled bank account, not the business’. This is serious fraudulent behaviour, but employees usually get away with it without raising any suspicion by creating non-existent suppliers and fake employees or using counterfeit credit notes to hide/disguise misappropriated monies.

An easy way to spot this type of financial fraud is to scour through the bank statements and financial records of your organisation and check for irregular activities or patterns of unusual and unauthorised transactions.

Another common sign of embezzlement is when either an employee or a manager/director begins to enjoy a lavish lifestyle that is obviously beyond their means, e.g. holidays, cars, clothes/jewellery. In the case that you suspect an employee or director might be embezzling funds from within your company, it is essential to be discreet in your employee fraud investigation to prevent the employee from covering their tracks and disposing of substantial evidence.

Other Common Types of Employee Fraud

  • Commission fraud – inflating sales figures to gain a more significant commission than deserved.
  • Petty fraud – for example, embellishing an expense claim or taking office supplies.
  • Money laundering – hiding the origin of illegally obtained money and washing it through your business.
  • Insider Trading – making a profit by using valuable information that is unavailable to the public to their advantage, for example, confidential information that could impact the prices of shares, securities, goods/commodities.
  • Manipulation of accounts – false information on sales, purchases or stock can be used to perpetrate fraud for personal financial gain, e.g. overstated trading profits to receive cash/share bonuses, or get a promotion, creating false trading accounts or stock/fixed asset write-offs to obtain goods.

What can you do (as an employer) to minimise employee fraud?

The most effective way to minimise employee fraud as an employer is to implement robust management procedures and employee background screening; the implementation of these preventative measures will ensure staff are adequately investigated and monitored and consider the possibilities for collusion between employees – including a conflict of interest. Paying attention to only the procedures within your accounts department is not sufficient. The same procedures can help you across your operations, including sales and procurement.

Minimise the chances of employee fraud with the following procedures:

  • Separation of employee responsibilities such as placing orders, recording invoices and collecting debts.
  • Requiring purchase or payment authorisation by more than one person.
  • Compare actual to budgeted expenditure for unexpected patterns.
  • Examine bank reconciliations thoroughly.
  • Scrutinise cancelled cheques and cheques made out to employees or unusual vendors.
  • Review supplier invoices for significant amounts, pricing or volumes.
  • Verify credit notes and write-offs with receiving records.
  • Install and monitor CCTV to deter theft of stock or equipment.

Fraud Triangle

An American criminologist, Donald R Cressey, devised a theory that involved three aspects that trigger fraud. Understanding these triggers will help you prevent fraud:

  • Opportunity – the lack of internal controls or reporting structure/oversight increase the chance of fraud.
  • Rationalisation – the fraudster will rationalise the continued deception, which increases slowly, perhaps over a few years, becoming an entitlement, i.e. I deserve this. This offers the chance to stop some employee fraud early if robust detection procedures are in place.
  • Pressure – overwhelming pressure, be it business factors such as company targets to meet or personal pressures, such as gambling or financial problems.

Implement Pre-employment and Post-employment employee screening now!

Preventing financial loss is crucial for your business’s survival and expansion, which is why it’s essential to know and understand its obvious signs. Use the list above as a guide to protecting your organisation.

To detect employee fraud professionally and thoroughly, it is recommended you seek the expertise of a skilled employee fraud accountant as early as possible. They can help you investigate your employees by reviewing your bank statements and financial documents and advise you whether an employee is committing fraud and to what extent. A forensic accountant’s report will also give you the evidence you need to take the necessary action against your employee and act as a deterrent to others.

For a free and confidential chat to discuss how we can help your business, contact us. 

 

About CRI Group

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk ManagementEmployee Background ScreeningBusiness IntelligenceDue DiligenceCompliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management SystemsISO 19600:2014 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification. ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

UK solicitor sentenced to four years in prison over £2.3m fraud

UK solicitor, Andrew Davies defrauding his firm £2.3m jailed

A former senior partner, the UK solicitor, has been jailed for four years after defrauding his firm out of a total of £2.3m. Andrew Davies, 59, paid personal invoices to himself from the business and under-declared £1.1m in stamp duty land tax to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) for over nine years.

Davies pleaded guilty to one count of fraud by false representation at Reading Crown Court in 2019 and was sentenced to four years imprisonment in January this year. As a senior partner at the firm, Andrew Davies managed to defraud it out of the money by paying personal invoices to himself from the business account.

The 59-year-old also under-declared £1.1m in Stamp Duty Land Tax to HMRC over nine years, over-declaring tax to clients and then taking money from the solicitor’s firms account for himself, both defrauding the company he worked for and HMRC at the same time.

Davies also raised invoices to pay over £1.6 million to his friend Stephen Allan, who worked as a property developer and was a firm client. The 62-year-old from Bishop’s Stortford was convicted at Reading Crown Court on one count of money laundering and jailed for three years.

In a statement, police mentioned the convictions and sentencing of a solicitor’s firm in Berkshire defrauded out of £2.3m between 2010 and 2017.

Allan then made smaller payments into Davies’ account and also pocketed around £400,000 himself. The solicitor extracted funds from the firm’s client account, paying it to Allan in transactions described as ‘fees’, but there was no known work for this.

Davies of The Street, West Clandon, Guildford, and Allan of Thornberry Road, Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire, were charged by police officers in August 2019.

The statement did not name the firm, but a Solicitors Regulation Authority notice has previously stated that Davies worked for Reading firm Pitmans LLP, which has since become part of another practice. Davies has already been struck by the Solicitors’ Disciplinary Tribunal and ordered to pay £17,000 in costs.

Investigating officer Detective Constable Katie Taylor of Thames Valley Police’s Economic Crime Unit said: ‘In this case, a solicitor trusted to safeguard client funds abused this position and systematically defrauded his firm of large sums of money for his benefit.

‘He then used a corrupt relationship to launder the proceeds of his crime through a property developer. These professional enablers of organised crime represent a significant risk, and we hope that the conviction and sentence, in this case, will act as a deterrent to others.’

Source: Financial Crime News & The Law Society Gazette

 

Get exclusive insights curated for subscriber-only when you join our mailing list.

About CRI Group

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk ManagementEmployee Background ScreeningBusiness IntelligenceDue DiligenceCompliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, the CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management SystemsISO 37301 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000 Risk Management, providing training and certification. ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations.

You suspect employee fraud. Now what?

When any type of fraud, including employee fraud, is discovered, it’s usually by surprise. That’s because most of us aren’t used to looking for criminal behaviour inside our own organisation. We trust…
Read More

5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening

Being HR professional, we have to deal with rigorous recruitment cycles, and for this, we must meet with several candidates before closing the vacancy. Every HR person has their style of evaluating the candidates, but one thing that needs to be kept in mind before making the final hiring decision is to “Never judge a book by its cover” (Stonehouse, 2017), since at times we might overlook some critical points, perhaps due to a fancy resume or qualification. Every HR professional should consider a crucial step before taking a candidate on board: run employee screening.

According to Business Week – 16% of executive resumes contain false academic claims and/or material omissions relating to educational experience. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that the average cost of a bad hiring decision can equal 30% of the first year’s potential earnings.If you are an HR professional and reading this article, then I can assure you that other HR professionals must be thinking, “is it worth investing additional time and money in pre-employment background screening service?” Let me tell you the key benefits that you can gain from conducting pre-employment background screening services:

1. Better Compliance: it keeps you out of legal issues

Let’s suppose one of your employees commits fraud in your company, and after investigations, you came to know that the employee did the same with previous employers. At this point, you will regret not conducting their background check, as if you had conducted their employment and criminal check, then you wouldn’t have hired them in the first place.

2. Ensures credibility when performing sensitive tasks

In addition to legal issues, some background checks can verify a candidate’s creditability in performing their on-job duties. For instance, when a candidate is being hired for the accounts department where petty cash and the company’s account handling are their primary responsibilities, their employment check may come across that his previous employment has concluded due to mishandling of accounts.

3. Safer Work Environment: keep employees and clients safe

Conducting Background checks can also convey a message throughout the company’s stakeholders, especially its clients, that all employees hired in the company have gone through rigorous checks. Therefore, the data shared by the clients are in safe hands, thus increasing the overall integrity of the company and its staff.

4. Verifies education and certification

The increase in the number of fake degrees has amplified the importance of pre-employment check of educations. Therefore, all degrees and certificates of the applicant under consideration should be verified. The outcome of verification is not just about checking an applicant’s honesty but also verifying the legal status of the degrees and their issuing authorities.

5. Stronger hires, more savings: it gives an overall picture of the applicants

Apart from the interviews, pre-employment background checks can help the interviewer to make their hiring decision accordingly. For instance, candidates may have successfully cleared the interview process, but in their employment checks, the company found that they had resigned from their services after they were accused of sexual harassment by colleagues. Irrespective of how competent a candidate is for the vacancy, such red flags regarding the candidate’s behaviour can completely change the hiring decision and safeguard the company from future issues.

It is indeed worth spending extra time and money on pre-employment background screening because making a wrong hiring decision can not only increase recruitment cost and time but may also incur the cost of damage that employee has given to the company, whether in the form of litigation’s or damaging the company’s goodwill.

5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening
5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening
5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening
5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening
5 Reasons To Run Employee Screening

 

So, if your company is not conducting background screening! Think Again!

Being in HR, you might be creating liability for the company by making the wrong hiring decision. It’s never too late to correct your actions, so contact us, and we can provide our employment background screening services. As it is rightly said, I quote, “better safe than sorry” (Bateson, 2008). 

CRI Group, based in London, works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk Management and Due Diligence solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

References

  1. Bateson, J., 2008. Building Hope: Leadership in the Nonprofit World. United States Of America: Greenwood Publishing Group.
  2. Stonehouse, R. A., 2017. You’re Hired! Job Search Strategies That Work. 1st ed. s.l.:eBookIt.com.

 

 

How to conduct background screening in the Middle East?

Background screening is critically important for business worldwide. Providing such service is a complex process, and it is different for every country and region. In the United States, investigators have a web of databases at their disposal and a vast network of local resources that provide a wealth of information at the mere click of a mouse. It’s a different world in the Middle East. Technology is limited in many parts of the region.  Privacy legislation varies from country to country and from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Cultural differences can impact the flow of information. Language barriers can contribute to inaccurate reporting.

Background Screening in the Middle East

Instead of database-driven investigations like those conducted in the U.S, professionals in the Middle East must conduct large parts of their investigations literally on foot, travelling to remote regions to scour records and interview sources. If you’re looking for accurate, reliable information in the Middle East you need to turn to qualified, professional sources that are familiar with the countries, cultures, terrain, languages, resources and – most of all – the laws that govern personal privacy. In this part of the world, your contacts and resources are your greatest assets.

Discovering Hard-to-Find Facts in Hard-to-Reach Locations

The biggest challenge in conducting background investigations in the Middle East is collecting reliable information most efficiently. This requires a well-trained and diverse group of professional investigators who are multilingual and multi-cultural, are familiar with those geographic regions and can easily traverse the obstacles that often impede international investigations. Those obstacles include:

  • Working with local customs offices.
  • Complying with data protection laws and mandates.
  • Knowledge level of local investigative researchers.
  • Lack of centralised information resources and databases; and
  • The proliferation of multicultural environments that are particularly influenced by locals who vastly differ in their approaches to investigative screening and public record searches, particularly with information collected via database sources.

The Obstacle of Background Investigators in the Middle East

To address these obstacles, successful background investigators in the Middle East are often required to work deep in the field, travelling to remote destinations to conduct interviews, develop resources and enlist local assistance to verify the information. Leading background screening firms will conduct investigations that regularly involve a thorough review of local press records, using online and proprietary databases augmented by manual field research to locate the appropriate public records.

This in-depth investigative approach is necessary to bring to light any instances of malfeasance or notable, publicly aired criticism. These professionals will also research all public records that are available within the respective government institutions such as a region’s trial courts, police and SEC sources, and global sanctions lists. The goal of providing this level of investigative legwork is to collect timely, well-documented and substantiated information which will measure up to the high standards often required by our U.S. partners.

Partner With Reputable Background Screening Firms in the Middle East

As the world economy shrinks and the pool of foreign job applicants expands, a partnership with a reputable international employee screening service provider to conduct investigations abroad is essential for maintaining a safe hiring program for your clients. To ensure you’re using the best providers available, a little investigating of your own will result in big benefits down the road.

Checklist on Securing Reputable Background Screening Service:

  • Research the listing of expatriate background screening firms provided by the Professional Background Screening Association https://thepbsa.org/.
  • Ask your provider how they comply with local and regional laws governing individual privacy protection; the methods they utilise in protecting information.
  • Make sure your service provider’s physical address is in the region they’re conducting investigations. If not, they could be simply outsourcing their cases to a third party.
  • Ask about the manner in which your service provider conducts investigations. Avoid firms that investigate exclusively through media searches.
  • Inquire about the internal policies and procedures the service provider uses to monitor the protection of data and if it conducts regular audits to ensure compliance with regional privacy mandates.
  • Specifically, the provider should be in compliance with GDPR and must maintain Information Security Management System ISMS (ISO27001).
  • Don’t settle for firms that say they specialise in providing checks of the International Terrorist Watch List and the OFAC watch list. Those lists are available online to anyone at no cost.
  • Avoid firms that won’t supply you with the source of the records they obtain, were available from public record resources. Also, be sure to ask how old the information collected is.
  • Reputable firms will combine in-depth field investigations with routine public records searches. Make sure your provider is doing both. Background checks involve investigative research and not just press clippings.
  • Service delivery is critical in foreign investigations. Ask about average turnaround times and get commitments for delivery in advance of the investigation.
  • Find out what other U.S. companies use as a service provider. Ask for references.
Employee Background Check

How do you know the candidate you just offered a role to is the ideal candidate? Are you 100% sure you know that everything they’re telling you is the truth? 90%? They showed you a diploma, how do you know it’s not photoshopped? Did you follow the correct laws during your background checks process? Employee background checks and necessary screenings are vital to avoid horror stories and taboo tales that occur within HR, your business, or even your brand – simply investing in a sufficient screening can save you time, money and heartbreak.

CRI Group has developed EmploySmart™, a robust new pre-employment background screening service, certified for BS7858,  to avoid negligent hiring liabilities. Ensure a safe work environment for all – EmploySmart™ can be tailored into specific screening packages to meet the requirements of each specific position within your company. We are a leading worldwide provider, specialised in local and international employee background checks, including pre-employment and post-employment background checks.

About CRI Group

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk ManagementEmployee Background ScreeningBusiness IntelligenceDue DiligenceCompliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, the CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management Systems, ISO 37301 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000 Risk Management, providing training and certification. ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

How is COVID-19 Radically Transforming the New-Hire Experience

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenging time for industries, organisations and their teams on every level. HR leaders had to adapt to a new normal quickly. Along with coping with the closing of workplaces and adjusting to working from home, many organisations had significant recruitment, vetting and onboarding activities. With two-thirds of employers reporting increased productivity for remote workers than in-office workers, businesses also discovered the benefits of a remote and flexible workforce. With the human element of HR almost vanishing overnight, HR leaders had to learn how to leverage the “digital” aspect of their jobs, ramp it up and implement it across their processes to deliver a new-hire experience and an overall good employee experience. And these changes are very likely to stay for the long haul.

This article explores how COVID-19 radically transformed the new-hire experience from recruitment to background screening, onboarding, and retention. We also explore some of the advantages of these changes and how you can leverage the new normal into your employee experience and increase retention.

The new normal

When COVID-19 struck, companies were faced with the difficult task of hiring quickly and economically, continuing effective onboarding processes, and changing the overall new-hire experience whilst managing the day-to-day risks and ever-changing challenges. COVID posed a lot of challenges when it comes to recruitment, such as:

  1. Navigating the new realm of virtual recruitment.
  2. High demand for recruitment in specific sectors (e.g., pharmaceuticals, retail supermarkets, delivery companies, transportation, retail banks, healthcare).
  3. The need to hire employees with a specific skill set (e.g., digital marketing, IT teams, customer service).
  4. Accommodating for existing staff working from home.
  5. Considering the long-term and short-term economic impact of hiring during the uncertainty of the pandemic.

There was also the onboarding process. Before the pandemic, some would say the process of onboarding an employee begins when the candidate is offered the position and continues until the new employee is considered productive – which could be anytime from the end of a probation period, for example, to a full year and the first appraisal. However, according to a recent survey by CareerBuilder, 25% of employers reported that their onboarding process took a day or less. In comparison, 26% spent a week, 21% over a month, and 11% said their onboarding process extends over three months or longer.

Furthermore, during the pandemic, the number of cases of employee fraud and misconduct grew substantially. In a survey conducted last year by CRI Group, an overwhelming number of respondents said the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting human resources at their company. There are also concerns about fraud, and the protection of confidential information, as much of the workforce has gone virtual in work-from-home (WFH) arrangements. CRI Group’s survey measures the pulse of human resources during a challenging time in business worldwide. The largest number (38%) of survey participants were human resources professionals, but respondents also included managers (19%); executives, directors and administrators (27%); and other roles.

Being digital in a COVID world, where face-to-face interaction is no longer possible, is mostly about optimising the end-to-end employee experience and leveraging data to deliver a somewhat personal employee onboarding experience. Outlined below are ten fundamental tips that support it:

1. Integrate employee information from screening to onboarding and deployment

Managing data is a challenge, but it is essential to ensure that the monitoring and engagement of the new hire remain consistent throughout the onboarding lifecycle. Integrate a system that includes Applicant Tracking System (ATS), recruitment, background screening, onboarding, and performance management, and learning/development systems.

2. There are no shortcuts in recruitment; background screening is more critical than ever

Many companies are hiring at an accelerated rate – especially in the medical profession and industries dealing with infectious diseases, medical supply, pharmaceutical companies and research facilities. A need for quick and effective pre-employment screening has arisen, but that is precisely why proper background screening is critical during COVID. Take the revised BS7858:2019 standard: When establishing policies and practices around the standard and vetting new hires against the standard, organisations can show that they place a high value on hiring individuals who possess integrity. Organisations can then task their new hires with responsibilities designed to keep their co-workers, customers and information safe from the negative forces that have become more prevalent in today’s ever-changing COVID-19 world.

3. Reduce insider fraud or misconduct risk and increase employee integration success rate from the get-go

Unfortunately, during the COVID-19 crisis, employee fraud has increased. According to a 2020 report from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, 5% of all revenue generated by organisations – some three and a half trillion pounds globally – is lost every year through fraud committed by employees. Effective background screening for candidates and employees is an essential and effective countermeasure.

4. Leverage HR technology, social media and remote working to elevate the employee experience

Remote working is very much a given in this era, so you must leverage technology to not only facilitate your new hire now but their job as a future permanent employee. It will also reduce the need for face-to-face support while at the same time encouraging proactivity and self-service. In today’s reality, employee experience is not just about boosting employee engagement but more about employee support effectiveness as a whole – while reducing dependencies on HR at the same time.

5. Engage new-hire from the get-go

Employee onboarding starts not just when the employee joins the organisation. Your very first email is the first experience the candidate has with your organisation. In the fast world of recruitment, too many sure candidates drop your process or reject your offers for a better one. It is essential to keep the candidate engaged while at the same time initiating a slow process of integrating her/him into the organisation asap — by doing so, you will improve the offer-to-join ratio.

6. Accelerate the time-to-competency for new hires by reducing the learning curve

It is important to establish expectations, set clear goals for the new hire, and monitor them consistently. Investing in employees’ professional development has always been an attractive “benefit” of any luring organisation. With COVID and the inability to learn on the job, this is more important. Why? Employees at all levels worldwide have been flung into a different and new way of working, which requires a very different skill set. According to Gallup, organisations that invest in employee development report 11% greater profitability. Every individual has his/ her learning style and ways of retaining information, so leverage all the digital tools available such as on-demand videos, live chats, virtual assistants, and other forms of interactive self-paced learning options.

7. Up-skilling your people by providing learning and knowledge retention tools on demand

Learning is key to making an employee productive. Training new and current employees to cope with the ongoing changes from the COVID-19 pandemic will help them remain productive. Employee retention like this is invaluable, especially as recruitment has become that bit trickier in a remote world. Do not lose top talent, knowledge and experience, for lacking that extra level of support.

8. Mental health is critical; it is time to acknowledge and practice it

The turbulence of today’s dual health and economic crises is unprecedented and is affecting employees. PwC’s 2020 Global Consumer Insights survey shows a shift in the consumer’s priority, with 69% saying they are caring more about their mental health and physical fitness, and 63% saying they want to eat healthier as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic. A study from Tilburg University in the Netherlands (commissioned by the IOSH – Institution of Occupational Safety and Health) estimated around 12.8 billion working days are lost due to anxiety and depression. The study concluded that organisations could help prevent mental health problems from becoming more severe and achieve a more sustainable workplace by paying attention to each individual’s situation and conditions. Employers must emphasise meeting individual needs and finding a more tailored approach where the new reality can safely “cohabit” with a desired new future. Leveraging social media to provide a robust peer support system is equally helpful – these will aid the onboarding process.

9. The employee continuously due diligence

Conduct a periodic review of existing employees. Investing in due diligence is vital to mitigate the risks and identify fraud. Periodically screening and vetting existing employees can protect and enhance the overall security of your organisation.

10. Cut costs drastically

Leveraging these new changes and integrating them into your onboarding cycle can help reduce expenses drastically across your business. It eliminates the cost that comes when placing the wrong candidate.

EmploySmart – take the first step towards transforming your employee background screening!

Businesses have to adapt quickly to survive, which can mean cutting steps in their hiring process, and no one knows how this will play out. Using a vendor to conduct your background screening effectively will invaluably make your onboarding process more scalable. It will allow you to focus on delivering consistently superior services to new hires across the board and, more importantly, focus on the fun stuff like supporting the new hire on their continued improvement.

We understand how important it is to monitor all stages from recruitment to onboarding and from onboarding to learning and development; that’s why our employee screening reports are easy to “transcribe” to whatever HR ecosystem you use. Our reports will essentially complement the effectiveness of any employee onboarding process and, therefore, your HR department.

Mitigate the employee risk impact! Learn how with this FREE ebook. Taken as a whole, this ebook is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and company looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to stay ahead of COVID-19 effectively. Read more or DOWNLOAD now!

EmploySmart | Most Robust Employee Background Check Service

How do you know the candidate you just offered a role to is the ideal candidate? Are you 100% sure you know that everything they’re telling you is the truth? 90%? They showed you a diploma, how do you know it’s not photoshopped? Did you follow the correct laws during your background checks process? Employee background checks and necessary screenings are vital to avoid horror stories and taboo tales that occur within HR, your business, or even your brand – simply investing in a sufficient screening can save you time, money and heartbreak.

CRI Group has developed EmploySmart™, a robust new pre-employment background screening service, certified for BS7858,  to avoid negligent hiring liabilities. Ensure a safe work environment for all – EmploySmart™ can be tailored into specific screening packages to meet the requirements of each specific position within your company. We are a leading worldwide provider, specialised in local and international employee background checks, including pre-employment and post-employment background checks.

About CRI Group

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk Management, Employee Background Screening, Business IntelligenceDue Diligence, Compliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management Systems, ISO 37301:2021 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification. ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

BS 7858:2019 | The new way to mitigate employee risk during COVID-19

BS 7858:2019 Standard: A new way to mitigate employee risk during COVID-19

BS 7858:2019 Standard is the revised standard for screening individuals working in secure environments. The far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 outbreak has affected virtually every business and economic sector worldwide. Depending on the global region, the far-reaching implications have hampered (on various levels) the ability to conduct proper and thorough background screening investigations.

In the United Kingdom and the United Arab Emirates, the countrywide lockdowns forced leaders to close sites and send their workforce home. Many have to learn how to manged people working from home (WFH) or remotely for the first time. The previous concerns about productivity, privacy and protecting sensitive information only grew more with the practice of WFH.

They highlighted the vital importance of pre-employment background screening and background investigations. BS 7858:2019 Standard for screening individuals working in secure environments offers a complete solution.

Unfortunately, conducting such investigations in a reliable and timely manner has brought its struggles. The closure of public information sources has dramatically impacted accessing public records to verify previous employment, education and criminal charges.

Drug screening tests have been delayed or postponed until such companies are permitted to reopen their doors for business. On the applicant side, it’s been widely reported that individuals are concerned (and rightly so) about participating in face-to-face interviews. Applicants are concerned with leaving their homes to do a drug test and, ultimately, returning to a work environment that may or may not appear healthy, protected and safe.

Recruitment fraud and how BS 7858:2019 standard provide the solutions

Investigators themselves have hesitations about venturing into the field to complete their assignments, which may require a high degree of boots-on-the-ground research and in-person interaction in many countries. Fortunately, the background screening industry is resilient.

It is steadily working around these obstacles to ensure that workplaces are safeguarded, workers, customers and property are protected, and sensitive information doesn’t fall into rogue hands. This is particularly important in those sectors that rely heavily on vetting personnel working in secure environments responsible for people, property, data and critical systems.

It’s important for the mere fact that a trending increase in recruitment fraud is creating additional challenges for already over-burdened employers. Last year recruitment fraud cost £23 billion in the UK alone.

The BS7858:2019 Standard

The recent update of the BS7858:2019 standard, “Screening of Individuals Working in a Secure Environment – Code of Practice,” emphasizes the risk assessment of secure environment workers. The code focuses on the need for tighter controls over the pre-employment screening – and periodic re-screening – of individuals, who in their positions, could potentially benefit from illicit personal gain, become compromised, or take advantage of other opportunities for creating breaches of confidentiality, trust or safety.

Written by the British Standards Institute, which is recognised as the UK’s national standards body, BS7858:2019 lays out the scope of “obtaining personal background information to enable organisations to make an informed decision, based on risk, on employing an individual in a secure environment.”

Those workers include business owners, directors, partners, silent partners and shareholders holding more than 10% of the business; managers, area managers, department managers, screening managers and staff; installers and service crew; security personnel; and office supervisors and staff with access to customer and system records.

The amended guidelines of the standard put the onus on the organisation’s top management to demonstrate that they are focused on the aspects of the business where the most risk lies and the particular personnel roles involved within those risks areas.

This is particularly important because, as the standard states, the “organisation retains ultimate responsibility for an outsourced screening process and is required to review the completed screening file.” Risks assessment includes examining certain roles that involve financial tasks, data security, goods management, property risks or any number of “people risks” such as roles with direct access to vulnerable adults and children.

To that end, management ensures that the organisation has proper and adequate resources and infrastructure to manage the adequate vetting of high-risk personnel. Management is tasked with the response and that there is a firm commitment at the top level to manage and support the coordination required to execute the screening process.

Finally, management is tasked with ensuring that such responsibilities are appropriately assigned and communicated throughout the organisation. The guideline also eliminates its original text in 2012, a requirement to produce character references as part of the screening process. This decision was based on the supposition that such references are now deemed potentially weak and difficult to verify. 

Price of a bad hire

The price of a bad hire has far-reaching consequences for any business, including productivity loss, decreased employee morale, risks to employee safety, increased exposure to costly negligent hiring claims, and potentially devastating litigation. The premise behind the standard is to safeguard employers from harmful or fraudulent hires. Cases of organisations that forego conducting due diligence on a new hire – especially a hire with high-risk exposure – often end badly for those organisations.

The revised BS7858:2019 standard enables organisations to demonstrate a commitment to safeguarding their businesses, employees, customers and information utilising widely accepted methods that focus on risk assessment and top-down management involvement in the company’s employment policies and practices. In establishing standards and practices, organisations can show that they place a high value on hiring individuals who possess integrity. Organisations can then task them with responsibilities designed to keep their co-workers, customers and information safe from the negative forces that have become more prevalent in today’s ever-changing COVID-19 world.

Playbook | Everything About BS 7858:2019 Standard

The price of a bad hire has far-reaching consequences for any business, including productivity loss, decreased employee morale, risks to employee safety, increased exposure to costly negligent hiring claims, and potentially devastating litigation. The premise behind the standard is to safeguard employers from bad or fraudulent hires. Cases of organisations that forego conducting due diligence on a new hire – especially a hire with high-risk exposure – often end badly for those organisations.

At CRI Group, we know how important is your background screening to your company’s success and to give you an idea of what is new, we have produced this playbook detailing the differences between the BS7858:2012 standard and the new BS7858:2019 standard.

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE PLAYBOOK

Managing people through COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is undeniable, affecting the world. And the situation is changing at an hourly rate as we go into a second global lockdown. Businesses have to adapt quickly to survive, i.e. cutting steps in their hiring process, and no one knows how this will play out. However, there are ways you can mitigate the impact, learn how from this free ebook.

Taken as a whole, this ebook is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and company looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to stay ahead of COVID-19 effectively. Read the answers to the following questions:

  • Does a candidate have to give consent to process a background check/screening?
  • How long does it take to conduct a background check?
  • When should I conduct pre-employment checks?
  • How often should I screen employees?
  • How to collect references, and what to ask?
  • How much does it cost to conduct background checks?
  • What is the difference between employment history verification and employment reference?

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE PLAYBOOK

FAQ E-Book | All About Background Checks

The price of a bad hire has far-reaching consequences for any business, including productivity loss, Get answers to frequently asked questions about background checks/screening cost, guidelines, check references etc.

Taken as a whole, it is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and company looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to make the right decisions. This eBook is a compilation of all of the background screening related questions you ever needed answers to:

  • Does a candidate have to give consent to process a background check/screening?
  • How long does it take to conduct a background check?
  • When should I conduct pre-employment checks?
  • How often should I screen employees?
  • How to collect references, and what to ask?
  • How much does it cost to conduct background checks?
  • What is the difference between employment history verification and employment reference?
  • How do I check on entitlement to work?
  • How to conduct identity checks?
  • What will a financial regulatory check show?
  • Is it possible to identify conflict of interest during checks?
  • What is a bankruptcy check?
  • What about directorships and shareholding search?
  • Can I have access to a criminal watch list?
  • Anti-money laundering check?
  • Can we conduct FACIS (fraud and abuse control information system) searches?

DOWNLOAD OUR FAQ EBOOK

CRI Group | BS7984:2008 Accredited Company

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk ManagementEmployee Background ScreeningBusiness IntelligenceDue DiligenceCompliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider.

We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management SystemsISO 37301:2021 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification.

ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

 

 

 

Background Investigations: One-on-one interview with Zafar Anjum

Background Investigations: One-on-one interview with Zafar Anjum

Having dedicated his career to a background investigation, fraud prevention, protective integrity, security and compliance, Zafar Anjum is a distinguished and highly respected professional in his field. As Group Chief Executive Officer at Corporate Research and Investigations Limited, he uses his extensive knowledge and expertise in creating stable and secure networks across challenging global markets. For organisations needing comprehensive project management, security, safeguard testing, background investigations and real-time compliance applications, Anjum is the assurance expert of choice for industry professionals.

Q: To what extent have you seen an increase in corporate fraud in recent years? What are some of the common themes and underlying causes?

Anjum: Fraud always seems to be increasing. No matter how sophisticated our attempts to prevent it become, perpetrators are always adapting with new methods. According to the 2020 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) Report to the nations, asset misappropriation is the leading type of occupational fraud. It makes up 86% of fraud cases and causes a median loss of $100,000. On the other spectrum, financial statement fraud schemes are the least common (10% of cases) but are the most costly, causing a median loss of $954,000. A typical fraud case can last 14 months before detection and cause a loss of $8,300 per month – a whopping 5% of an organisations revenue is lost to fraud each year. There are various factors at play here, but it starts with ‘tone at the top’. Basically, corporate culture often sets the tone for how strict or lax an organisation prevents or detects fraud. Combine a lax approach with a country or jurisdiction where corruption is still prevalent, even considered ‘business as usual, and there will likely be a fraud.

Q: Could you outline the benefits of using background investigations to reduce potential fraud? Under what circumstances is it prudent to undertake a background investigation?

Anjum: It should be a priority to conduct thorough background investigations when engaging in a merger or acquisition, an initial public offering (IPO), engaging suppliers, contractors or new clients – your client relationships can affect your organisation’s reputation and your ability – to name a few situations. This can help you avoid becoming entangled with third parties that have hidden fraud and other legal issues. It will also make you aware of a potential partner who has credit risk, has claimed bankruptcy or is faced with debtor filings, for example. In one case, a company was seeking to engage a new supplier for medical supplies and equipment. A background investigation revealed that the warehouse’s physical location – claimed by this ‘supplier’ did not exist. The company’s principal had previously been charged with a ‘criminal breach of trust’. Three other civil damages claims against the principal were discovered, with millions claimed in liabilities.

Q: What are some of the best practice approaches to conducting a background investigation? 

Anjum: One of the most important aspects of thorough background investigations is having a ‘boots on the ground approach. Online database searches can only take you so far. When conducting due diligence on entities or individuals, red flags that pop up often warrant further checking before they can be truly weighed as part of the decision process. For example, if you are considering partnering with another company and providing information for their physical location, do you have agents who can visit that location to make sure it is legitimate? Investigations sometimes discover that purported ‘headquarters’ is actually an abandoned home or vacant lot. Also, if certain credentials are claimed, you need to make phone calls or possibly a visit to the school or accrediting bodies to verify them. These are the important details that help you with facts that help guide your decisions.

EFFECTIVE RISK MANAGEMENT THROUGH BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS. FIND OUT HERE

Q: What kinds of legal or regulatory issues might complicate a background investigation?

Anjum: Privacy laws are probably the most important issue, and they need to be carefully understood and followed for every jurisdiction. In the UK, for example, the pandemic has created new data privacy issues, but prudent organisations are constantly evaluating their data protection strategies under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). When it comes to background investigations, similar privacy considerations apply. You might want to check an individuals’ financial or credit history – relevant information if they own a business you seek to partner with or acquire, or if you are considering them for a high-level position at your organisation. Accessing such information is permitted in some jurisdictions and restricted by law in others. The last thing you want is to end up in court for violating someone’s privacy. It is best to engage a professional due diligence background screening firm. They will be trained and up-to-date on the laws governing your background investigations, plus they will have access to resources that most companies do not have.

Q: To what extent are background investigations more challenging in a cross-border or multi-jurisdictional context? How can these additional challenges be overcome or avoided?

Anjum: This goes back to the importance of having investigators in various locations, your ‘boots on the ground’, in your approach to due diligence. The world is much smaller these days as organisations seek to expand across international borders. And the COVID-19 is teaching leaders invaluable lessons in business efficiencies and future strategy. This can lead to obvious challenges – both following the laws and regulations in various jurisdictions and overcoming language and cultural barriers. That is why it is important to have access to locally-based agents – including certified fraud examiners and similarly credentialed professionals – to help with your checks, whether investigating a potential third-party partner or an individual being considered for employment. Another advantage is to have a set, written policy and process for conducting background investigations that you can reference and rely upon when undertaking key business decisions. In this way, your organisation is less susceptible to someone convincing you to bypass proper due diligence simply because it might seem logistically difficult to conduct an overseas investigation.

MITIGATE EMPLOYEE RISK BEFORE & AFTER HIRE? LEARN MORE HERE

Q: Once the background investigation results are collated, what are the key points to analysing?

Anjum: If red flags are uncovered, the best way to further investigate is to understand discrepancies. For example, suppose you are conducting background screening on a potential employee, and something comes up in their criminal record, rather than eliminating them from consideration. In that case, you should ensure that there was no error in your background check, investigate the discrepancy, gather all relevant information, and ask the person to explain what you found and why they did not disclose it. They might have an explanation that affects your decision process. In other words, do not overlook potential talent. According to Nacro, more than 11 million people in the UK have a criminal record – that’s 1 in 3 men – however, just over half of these had been convicted on only one occasion, and 85% were convicted before they were 30 years old. Not all of those have a prison record, however. Most convictions are for motoring offences, such as speeding or unpaid tickets.

Q: What essential advice would you offer to companies on developing internal policies and processes to combat fraud? should intensive background investigations form part of their standard procedures?

Anjum: Intensive background investigations should be a part of an organisation’s standard procedures. It should be part of a greater risk management plan, be set forth as written policy that owners and directors approve, and be reviewed and understood by management and other relevant personnel. Engage risk management professionals when developing your policies and procedures. They can help tailor a plan based o your organisation. Key questions to address should include; who will implement the plan, how an investigation is conducted, who evaluates and reports the results, etc. Sometimes organisations put forth a thorough, excellent programme for background investigations and then, six months or a year later, nobody is following it. The key to success is following through with it and ensuring your entire organisation understands the process and why it is so important. The security of your company depends on effective risk management.

The security of your company depends on effective risk management

Background investigations are critical to any company’s success because working with qualified, honest and hard-working employees and other businesses is integral to thriving in the business community. What you don’t know can hurt you, and the simple act of one bad decision can result in an unprecedented loss for your company. 

From vendor and third-party screening to employment screening, CRI Group recommends background investigations as critical proactive measures to help keep your business safe. An effective background screening investigation will help screen for bad apples that can cause havoc down the road. Because we maintain a diverse talent base comprised of multilingual and multi-cultural professionals, CRI can traverse obstacles that often impede international background investigations. That’s why we are frequently contracted by our competitors to conduct background investigations in geographic regions not serviced or accessible by larger investigative firms. 

Meet our CEO

Zafar I. Anjum is Group Chief Executive Officer of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, business due to diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading businesses organisations.  Headquartered in London (with a significant presence throughout the region) and licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM, CRI Group safeguards businesses by establishing the legal compliance, financial viability, and integrity levels of outside partners, suppliers and customers seeking to affiliate with your business. CRI Group maintains offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China, the USA, and the United Kingdom.

Contact CRI Group to learn more about its 3PRM-Certified™ third-party risk management strategy program and discover an effective and proactive approach to mitigating the risks associated with corruption, bribery, financial crimes and other dangerous risks posed by third-party partnerships.

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, CFE, CII, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime) | CRI Group Chief Executive Officer

37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA United Kingdom

t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

 

Who is CRI Group?

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk Management, Employee Background Screening, Business IntelligenceDue Diligence, Compliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider.

We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS 102000:2013 and BS 7858:2012 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management Systems, ISO 37301:2021 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification.

ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

 

Address Risk with Employee Background Checks

Employee Background Checks

We have all heard of the term “employee background checks”, but what is the exact function of this process? There are inherent risks in the hiring process, including fraudulent claims by candidates. These include everything from relatively minor transgressions, like stretching employment dates, to severe and concerning deceptions, such as claiming unearned degrees or credentials or hiding one’s criminal record. Being aware of these risks is only the first step, and companies that don’t take steps to address them, such as thorough, comprehensive background checks as part of their hiring policies, are putting themselves in peril. Several case studies have shown companies learning this lesson the hard way.

In one recent case, a semiconductor manufacturing company noticed that its finances weren’t adding up. Auditors traced the discrepancies to around the time when a company had hired a new CFO – and so the investigation began. When contacted, the CFO’s previous employers reported that the individual had been terminated due to cash embezzlement, harassment and workplace violence. In the end, the case proved costly to the semiconductor company. The CFO was terminated and prosecuted, but nearly $200,000 had been embezzled, and most of it could not be recovered (it was already spent, as the fraud had been taking place over four years).

Proper background checks and a thorough vetting of references would have exposed the fraudster before he had ever set foot in his office as a CFO. The proactive approach would have saved the company in lost revenues, human resources investment (extensive auditing and investigation) and damage to reputation.

When an organisation is ready to add a critical layer of security to its hiring process, Organisation should consider the following:

  • Evaluate the current process: What is the company’s existing, written policy for hiring new employees? How does it address background checks, due diligence, and other issues? Is the process followed in every case?
  • Risk areas: Some positions are more sensitive than others. For example, the CFO at the semiconductor company was well-placed to commit fraud. What are some other job positions and responsibilities that have a heightened risk factor?
  • Ownership of the process: Ultimately, who has the responsibility of vetting new hires? Is it ownership? Human resources? Individual managers? It might be a collaborative process. All of those involved in hiring should also be involved in implementing a due diligence solution that includes background checks.
  • The current workforce: Proper due diligence doesn’t just apply to prospective new hires. The organisation should also use it to evaluate your current workforce periodically. Examine the various roles and personnel at your organisation. Consider a policy that addresses risk areas with background checks to ensure that you don’t have any employees among your ranks that might have criminal backgrounds or other issues that your company is unaware of.

After performing a thorough evaluation of the organisation’s needs in terms of effective pre-and post-employment background checks, it’s time to consider whether to conduct such checks in-house or use an outside expert firm.

Some larger corporations might already have access to dynamic resources for background checks and a team of trained staff to conduct them. Most businesses, however, do not. In such cases, enlisting the services of a firm that conducts background checks as part of its main course of business makes sense. Investing in proper due diligence can save severe problems down the road.

Managing your people through COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is undeniable, affecting the world. And the situation is changing at an hourly rate as we go into a second global lockdown. Businesses have to adapt quickly to survive, i.e. cutting steps in their hiring process, and no one knows how this will play out. However, there are ways you can mitigate the impact, learn how with this FREE ebook. Taken as a whole, this ebook is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and company looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to stay ahead of COVID-19 effectively. Read the answers to the following questions:

  • How to turn the tide’ on coronavirus crisis?;
  • COVID-19 Action point checklist;
  • Background Screening: Essential Checks;
  • 6 steps for good practice in connection with COVID-19;
  • 11 Steps to Reduce Personnel Costs;
  • COVID-19 General advice;
  • How to remove any danger to your business during COVID-19;

Download your “Employee Screening during COVID-19: everything you need to know and more! FREE ebook here!

Frequently asked questions about background checks.

Get answers to frequently asked questions about background checks/screening cost, guidelines, check references etc. This eBook is a compilation of all of the background screening related questions you ever needed answers to:

  • Does a candidate have to give consent to process a background check/screening?
  • How long does it take to conduct a background check?
  • When should I conduct pre-employment checks?
  • How often should I screen employees?
  • How to collect references, and what to ask?
  • How much does it cost to conduct background checks?
  • What is the difference between employment history verification and employment reference?
  • How do I check on entitlement to work?
  • How to conduct identity checks?
  • What will a financial regulatory check show?
  • Is it possible to identify a conflict of interest during checks?
  • What is a bankruptcy check?
  • What about directorships and shareholding search?
  • Can I have access to a criminal watch list?
  • Anti-money laundering check?
  • Can we conduct FACIS (fraud and abuse control information system) searches?
  • … and MORE!

Taken as a whole, is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and companies looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to make the right decisions.

 

Meet our CEO

Zafar I. Anjum is Group Chief Executive Officer of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, business due diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading businesses organisations.  Headquartered in London (with a significant presence throughout the region) and licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM, CRI Group safeguards businesses by establishing the legal compliance, financial viability, and integrity levels of outside partners, suppliers and customers seeking to affiliate with your business. CRI Group maintains offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China, the USA, and the United Kingdom.

Contact CRI Group to learn more about its 3PRM-Certified™ third-party risk management strategy program and discover an effective and proactive approach to mitigating the risks associated with corruption, bribery, financial crimes and other dangerous risks posed by third-party partnerships.

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, CFE, CII, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime) | CRI Group Chief Executive Officer

37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA United Kingdom

t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

 

About CRI Group

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk Management, Employee Background Screening, Business IntelligenceDue Diligence, Compliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider.

We have the largest proprietary network of background screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are, we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS102000:2013, and BS7858:2019 Certifications is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched the Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management Systems, ISO 19600:2014 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification.

ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.

 

 

CRI, the only company with BS102000 & BS7858 certifications in Middle East

What is BS7858 & BS102000? The BS7858:2019 standard, “Screening of Individuals Working in a Secure Environment – Code of Practice,” places emphasis on the risk assessment of secure environment workers. The code focuses on the need for tighter controls over the pre-employment screening – and periodic re-screening – of individuals, who in their positions could potentially benefit from illicit personal gain, become compromised, or take advantage of other opportunities for creating breaches of confidentiality, trust or safety. Read more here.

When it comes to providing information security, financial audits, risk assessments, background checks, due diligence and a wide range of anti-fraud related services, maintaining the highest levels of training and expertise is an absolute must. That’s why CRI Group achieves critical certifications from the British Standards Institute (BSI), the National Association of Background Screeners (NAPBS) and other preeminent groups in the security and anti-fraud field as part of the company’s commitment to its clients. 

CRI Group is the first and only investigative research company in the Middle East to receive the certifications BS102000:2013, Code of Practice for the Provision of Investigative Services, and BS7858:2019, screening of individuals working in a secure environment, from internationally recognised training and certification body BSI. CRI Group also holds other BSI certifications (more on those within this article).

Founded in 1901, BSI is the UK national standards body that works with thousands of organisations in more than 150 countries. BSI is accredited by 20 local and international bodies. We sat down with CRI Group President and CEO Zafar I Anjum, CFE, to discuss these certifications and what they mean:

CRI Group is the only firm of its kind in the Middle East to hold the BS102000:2013 and BS7858:2019 certifications. What led you to embark on gaining these and other certifications from BSI?

Anjum: Just a few years ago, we announced that CRI Group would be engaging BSI for training and certification on many levels, and these and other certifications are direct results of that initiative. Earning multiple certifications from a distinguished standards body like BSI is a mark of pride for us as it demonstrates expertise in our core services.

BS102000:2013 is the “Code of Practice for the Provision of Investigative Services.” What does this mean?

Anjum: This certifies CRI Group’s proficiency in providing services regarding fraud risk assessment and investigations, forensic accounting, intellectual property (IP) investigations, due diligence and background investigations, debt collections, corporate security consulting and investigation, pre-and post-employment screening and fraud and crime investigations.

BS7858:2019 denotes “Security Screening of Individuals Employed in a Security Environment.” Please tell us more about this certification.

Anjum: This recognises CRI Group’s expertise in screening services including identity checks, financial checks, employment checks and criminal records checks. CRI Group implemented this standard with regular external audits conducted by BSI and adhered to recommendations specifically vetting and conducting employment background screening of security personnel seeking affiliations with security companies.

How does this relate to CRI Group’s EmploySmart program?

Anjum: Background screening professionals must be on the cutting edge of industry technology and resources – while also staying educated on the changing laws and regulations that govern the field. At CRI Group, we are proud to provide the most extensive and thorough background screening services as part of our EmploySmart program.

CRI Group also holds the certifications ISO/IEC 27001:2013, Information Security Management System and you are a credentialed NAPBS (National Association of Professional Background Screeners) Research Provider. Congratulations on these distinguished credentials!

Anjum: Thank you. We are pleased to have our expertise in these areas recognised by BSI, NAPBS and other leading bodies, and we will continue to strive to provide the top level of service for businesses to help them prevent and detect fraud.

BS7858:2019, a new way to mitigate employee risk during COVID-19

The far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 outbreak has affected virtually every business and economic sector worldwide, and depending on the global region, has hampered (on various levels) the ability to conduct proper and thorough background screening investigations. In the United Kingdom and the United Arab Emirates, the countrywide lockdowns forced leaders to close sites and send their workforce home. Many are having to learn how to manged people working from home (WFH) or remotely for the first time. The previous concerns about productivity, privacy and protecting sensitive information only grew more with the practice of WFH. They highlighted the vital importance of pre-employment background screening and background investigations. BS7858:2019: the revised standard for screening individuals working in secure environments offers a complete solution.

Find out how you can mitigate employee risk during this pandemic with BS7858:2019 

The revised BS7858:2019 standard enables organisations to demonstrate a commitment to safeguarding their businesses, employees, customers and information utilising widely accepted methods that focus on risk assessment and top-down management involvement in the company’s employment policies and practices. In establishing policies and practices around the standard, organisations can show that they place a high value on hiring individuals who possess integrity. Organisations can then task them with responsibilities designed to keep their co-workers, customers and information safe from the negative forces that have become more prevalent in today’s ever-changing COVID-19 world.

BS7858:2019, everything you need to know and more!

The price of a bad hire has far-reaching consequences for any business, including productivity loss, decreased employee morale, risks to employee safety and increased exposure to costly negligent hiring claims and potentially devastating litigation. The premise behind the standard is to safeguard employers from bad or fraudulent hires. Cases of organisations that forego conducting due diligence on a new hire – especially a hire with high-risk exposure – often end badly for those organisations. At CRI Group we know how important is your background screening to your company’s success and to give you an idea of what is new we have produced this playbook detailing the differences between BS7858:2012 standard and the new BS7858:2019 standard.

Download your “BS7858:2019, everything you need to know and more!” playbook here…

Managing your people through COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is undeniable affecting the world. And the situation is changing at an hourly rate as we go into a second global lockdown. Businesses are having to adapt quickly in order to survive, i.e. cutting steps in their hiring process, and no-one knows how this will play out. However, there are ways you can mitigate the impact, learn how with this FREE ebook. Taken as a whole, this ebook is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and companies looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to effectively stay ahead of COVID-19. Read the answers to the following questions:

  • How to turn the tide’ on coronavirus crisis?;
  • COVID-19 Action point checklist;
  • Background Screening: Essential Checks;
  • 6 steps for good practice in connection with COVID-19;
  • 11 Steps to Reduce Personnel Costs;
  • COVID-19 General advice;
  • How to remove any danger to your business during COVID-19;
  • … and more!

Download your “Employee Screening during COVID-19: everything you need to know and more! FREE ebook here!

Frequently asked questions about background checks

Get answers to frequently asked questions about background checks/screening cost, guidelines, check references etc. This eBook is a compilation of all of the background screening related questions you ever needed answers to:

  • Does a candidate have to give consent to process a background check/screening?
  • How long does it take to conduct a background check?
  • When should I conduct pre-employment checks?
  • How often should I screen employees?
  • How to collect references and what to ask?
  • How much does it cost to conduct background checks?
  • What is the difference between employment history verification and employment reference?
  • How do I check on entitlement to work?
  • How to conduct identity checks?
  • What will a financial regulatory check show?
  • Is it possible to identify a conflict of interest during checks?
  • What is a bankruptcy check?
  • What about directorships and shareholding search?
  • Can I have access to a criminal watch list?
  • Anti-money laundering check?
  • Can we conduct FACIS (fraud and abuse control information system) searches?
  • … and MORE!

Taken as a whole, is the perfect primer for any HR professional, business leader and companies looking to avoid employee background screening risks. It provides the tools and knowledge needed to make the right decisions.[/vc_column_text][accordion_father][accordion_son title=”Meet our CEO” clr=”#ffffff” bgclr=”#1e73be”]Zafar I. Anjum, is Group Chief Executive Officer of CRI Group (www.crigroup.com), a global supplier of investigative, forensic accounting, business due diligence and employee background screening services for some of the world’s leading business organisations.  Headquartered in London (with significant presence throughout the region) and licensed by the Dubai International Financial Centre-DIFC, the Qatar Financial Center-QFC, and the Abu Dhabi Global Market-ADGM, CRI Group safeguards businesses by establishing the legal compliance, financial viability, and integrity levels of outside partners, suppliers and customers seeking to affiliate with your business. CRI Group maintains offices in UAE, Pakistan, Qatar, Singapore, Malaysia, Brazil, China, USA, and the United Kingdom.

Contact CRI Group to learn more about its 3PRM-Certified™ third-party risk management strategy program and discover an effective and proactive approach to mitigating the risks associated with corruption, bribery, financial crimes and other dangerous risks posed by third-party partnerships.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Zafar Anjum, MSc, MS, CFE, CII, MICA, Int. Dip. (Fin. Crime) | CRI Group Chief Executive Officer

37th Floor, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AA United Kingdom

t: +44 207 8681415 | m: +44 7588 454959 | e: zanjum@crigroup.com

About CRI Group 

Based in London, CRI Group works with companies across the Americas, Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia-Pacific as a one-stop international Risk Management, Employee Background Screening, Business IntelligenceDue Diligence, Compliance Solutions and other professional Investigative Research solutions provider. We have the largest proprietary network of background-screening analysts and investigators across the Middle East and Asia. Our global presence ensures that no matter how international your operations are we have the network needed to provide you with all you need, wherever you happen to be. CRI Group also holds BS102000:2013 and BS7858:2019 Certifications, is an HRO certified provider and partner with Oracle.

In 2016, CRI Group launched Anti-Bribery Anti-Corruption (ABAC®) Center of Excellence – an independent certification body established for ISO 37001:2016 Anti-Bribery Management Systems, ISO 19600:2014 Compliance Management Systems and ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management, providing training and certification. ABAC® operates through its global network of certified ethics and compliance professionals, qualified auditors and other certified professionals. As a result, CRI Group’s global team of certified fraud examiners work as a discreet white-labelled supplier to some of the world’s largest organisations. Contact ABAC® for more on ISO Certification and training.